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2018-04-20

Mobile Skyscraper for a Disaster Area

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What could be more incredible than a mobile skyscraper? A team of Polish architects created a concept that can revolutionize our understanding of high-rise construction.

This foldable skyscraper concept was designed by Polish architects to assist in disaster areas, and it won the eVolo Skyscraper Competition this year.

The unloading tower called Skyshelter.zip was designed by Damian Granosik, Jakub Kulisa, and Peter Panychik for delivery by helicopter.

The main goal in the development of an innovative building was the access of medical workers and rescuers to remote areas of disasters that are inaccessible to vehicles.

The lightweight slabs that form each floor are created using 3D printing. They are fixed with steel cables attached to a huge helium cylinder. This design is weatherproof.

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“Depending on the amount of gas in the balloon, you can control the number of floors that unfold,” the designers explained during the presentation.

The skyscraper can accommodate a hospital for first aid, temporary housing, a safe and dry place to store food and necessary ammunition, and even “a vertical farm that uses soil collected during anchorage.”

According to architects, such a foldable skyscraper takes up to 30 times less space than a traditional campground, which unfolds during a cataclysm. This means that the time required to clear this area is reduced.

The team also suggested using ETFE-based nanomaterial embedded in tiny solar panels so that the tower could produce its clean energy in the case of a power outage. The balloon at the top of the structure has a hollow structure for collecting and filtering rainwater.

This truly revolutionary solution for architecture and engineering is designed to save lives in conditions where traditional solutions are simply not available or take too much time to implement. In times of disaster, saving time equals saved lives.

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